Mathematical Model of Fibrin Polymerization

A.I. Lobanov; A.V. Nikolaev; T.K. Starozhilova

Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena (2011)

  • Volume: 6, Issue: 7, page 55-69
  • ISSN: 0973-5348

Abstract

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Blood clotting system (BCS) modelling is an important issue with a plenty of applications in medicine and biophysics. The BCS main function is to form a localized clot at the site of injury preventing blood loss. Mutual influence of fibrin clot consisting mainly of fibrin polymer gel and blood flow is an important factor for BCS to function properly. The process of fibrin polymer mesh formation has not adequately been described by current mathematical models. That is why it is not possible to define the borders of growing clot and model its interaction with a blood flow. This paper main goal is to propose physically well-founded mathematical model of fibrin polymerization and gelation. The proposed model defines the total length of fibrin polymer fibers in the unit volume, determines a position of the border between gel and liquid and allows to evaluate the permeability of growing gel. Without significant structural changes the proposed model could be modified to include the blood shear rate influence on the fibrin polymerization and gelation.

How to cite

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Lobanov, A.I., Nikolaev, A.V., and Starozhilova, T.K.. "Mathematical Model of Fibrin Polymerization." Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena 6.7 (2011): 55-69. <http://eudml.org/doc/222346>.

@article{Lobanov2011,
abstract = {Blood clotting system (BCS) modelling is an important issue with a plenty of applications in medicine and biophysics. The BCS main function is to form a localized clot at the site of injury preventing blood loss. Mutual influence of fibrin clot consisting mainly of fibrin polymer gel and blood flow is an important factor for BCS to function properly. The process of fibrin polymer mesh formation has not adequately been described by current mathematical models. That is why it is not possible to define the borders of growing clot and model its interaction with a blood flow. This paper main goal is to propose physically well-founded mathematical model of fibrin polymerization and gelation. The proposed model defines the total length of fibrin polymer fibers in the unit volume, determines a position of the border between gel and liquid and allows to evaluate the permeability of growing gel. Without significant structural changes the proposed model could be modified to include the blood shear rate influence on the fibrin polymerization and gelation.},
author = {Lobanov, A.I., Nikolaev, A.V., Starozhilova, T.K.},
journal = {Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena},
keywords = {fibrin; clotting; polymerization; gelation},
language = {eng},
month = {6},
number = {7},
pages = {55-69},
publisher = {EDP Sciences},
title = {Mathematical Model of Fibrin Polymerization},
url = {http://eudml.org/doc/222346},
volume = {6},
year = {2011},
}

TY - JOUR
AU - Lobanov, A.I.
AU - Nikolaev, A.V.
AU - Starozhilova, T.K.
TI - Mathematical Model of Fibrin Polymerization
JO - Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena
DA - 2011/6//
PB - EDP Sciences
VL - 6
IS - 7
SP - 55
EP - 69
AB - Blood clotting system (BCS) modelling is an important issue with a plenty of applications in medicine and biophysics. The BCS main function is to form a localized clot at the site of injury preventing blood loss. Mutual influence of fibrin clot consisting mainly of fibrin polymer gel and blood flow is an important factor for BCS to function properly. The process of fibrin polymer mesh formation has not adequately been described by current mathematical models. That is why it is not possible to define the borders of growing clot and model its interaction with a blood flow. This paper main goal is to propose physically well-founded mathematical model of fibrin polymerization and gelation. The proposed model defines the total length of fibrin polymer fibers in the unit volume, determines a position of the border between gel and liquid and allows to evaluate the permeability of growing gel. Without significant structural changes the proposed model could be modified to include the blood shear rate influence on the fibrin polymerization and gelation.
LA - eng
KW - fibrin; clotting; polymerization; gelation
UR - http://eudml.org/doc/222346
ER -

References

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