Displaying similar documents to “An age-dependent model describing the spread of panleucopenia virus within feline populations”

Epidemiological Models With Parametric Heterogeneity : Deterministic Theory for Closed Populations

A.S. Novozhilov (2012)

Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena

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We present a unified mathematical approach to epidemiological models with parametric heterogeneity, i.e., to the models that describe individuals in the population as having specific parameter (trait) values that vary from one individuals to another. This is a natural framework to model, e.g., heterogeneity in susceptibility or infectivity of individuals. We review, along with the necessary theory, the results obtained using the discussed...

Generalization of the Kermack-McKendrick SIR Model to a Patchy Environment for a Disease with Latency

J. Li, X. Zou (2009)

Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena

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In this paper, with the assumptions that an infectious disease has a fixed latent period in a population and the latent individuals of the population may disperse, we reformulate an SIR model for the population living in two patches (cities, towns, or countries etc.), which is a generalization of the classic Kermack-McKendrick SIR model. The model is given by a system of delay differential equations with a fixed delay accounting for the latency and non-local terms caused by the mobility...

Memory Effects in Population Dynamics : Spread of Infectious Disease as a Case Study

A. Pimenov, T.C. Kelly, A. Korobeinikov, M.J.A. O’Callaghan, A.V. Pokrovskii, D. Rachinskii (2012)

Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena

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Modification of behaviour in response to changes in the environment or ambient conditions, based on memory, is typical of the human and, possibly, many animal species.One obvious example of such adaptivity is, for instance, switching to a safer behaviour when in danger, from either a predator or an infectious disease. In human society such switching to safe behaviour is particularly apparent during epidemics. Mathematically, such changes...