Modeling Adaptive Behavior in Influenza Transmission

W. Wang

Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena (2012)

  • Volume: 7, Issue: 3, page 253-262
  • ISSN: 0973-5348

Abstract

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Contact behavior plays an important role in influenza transmission. In the progression of influenza spread, human population reduces mobility to decrease infection risks. In this paper, a mathematical model is proposed to include adaptive mobility. It is shown that the mobility response does not affect the basic reproduction number that characterizes the invasion threshold, but reduces dramatically infection peaks, or removes the peaks. Numerical calculations indicate that the mobility response can provide a very good protection to susceptible individuals, and a combination of mobility response and treatment is an effective way to control influenza outbreak.

How to cite

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Wang, W.. "Modeling Adaptive Behavior in Influenza Transmission." Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena 7.3 (2012): 253-262. <http://eudml.org/doc/222262>.

@article{Wang2012,
abstract = {Contact behavior plays an important role in influenza transmission. In the progression of influenza spread, human population reduces mobility to decrease infection risks. In this paper, a mathematical model is proposed to include adaptive mobility. It is shown that the mobility response does not affect the basic reproduction number that characterizes the invasion threshold, but reduces dramatically infection peaks, or removes the peaks. Numerical calculations indicate that the mobility response can provide a very good protection to susceptible individuals, and a combination of mobility response and treatment is an effective way to control influenza outbreak.},
author = {Wang, W.},
journal = {Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena},
keywords = {mobility; response; pattern; stability},
language = {eng},
month = {6},
number = {3},
pages = {253-262},
publisher = {EDP Sciences},
title = {Modeling Adaptive Behavior in Influenza Transmission},
url = {http://eudml.org/doc/222262},
volume = {7},
year = {2012},
}

TY - JOUR
AU - Wang, W.
TI - Modeling Adaptive Behavior in Influenza Transmission
JO - Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena
DA - 2012/6//
PB - EDP Sciences
VL - 7
IS - 3
SP - 253
EP - 262
AB - Contact behavior plays an important role in influenza transmission. In the progression of influenza spread, human population reduces mobility to decrease infection risks. In this paper, a mathematical model is proposed to include adaptive mobility. It is shown that the mobility response does not affect the basic reproduction number that characterizes the invasion threshold, but reduces dramatically infection peaks, or removes the peaks. Numerical calculations indicate that the mobility response can provide a very good protection to susceptible individuals, and a combination of mobility response and treatment is an effective way to control influenza outbreak.
LA - eng
KW - mobility; response; pattern; stability
UR - http://eudml.org/doc/222262
ER -

References

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