Limitation and Regulation of Ecological Populations: a Meta-analysis of Tipula paludosa Field Data

R. P. Blackshaw; S. V. Petrovskii

Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena (2010)

  • Volume: 2, Issue: 4, page 46-62
  • ISSN: 0973-5348

Abstract

top
Whether the size of an animal population is environmentally limited or regulated by density dependent negative feedback mechanisms is of ecological interest. Proponents of limitation theory have issued a set of specific challenges which are addressed in this paper using field data for the insect Tipula paludosa. This species is known to be subject to population crashes caused by adverse environmental conditions and assumed to be limited. We re-examine published data in support of this hypothesis and show that there is also evidence of negative feedback between generations. Meta-analyses of annual count data from individual fields, and regional surveys provide further evidence of negative feedback and it is concluded that population regulation occurs at both local and regional scales. Evidence from other studies is used to propose that cannibalism is the causative mechanism. Since similar negative feedback responses were apparent under both normal and environmentally limiting conditions when populations crash, a single population model that could simulate the differing regional dynamics observed from the annual surveys was produced. We conclude that the range of annual fluctuations observed in T. paludosa populations is the outcome of both limiting and regulating processes, confirming from field observations that these are not exclusive mechanisms.

How to cite

top

Blackshaw, R. P., and Petrovskii, S. V.. "Limitation and Regulation of Ecological Populations: a Meta-analysis of Tipula paludosa Field Data." Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena 2.4 (2010): 46-62. <http://eudml.org/doc/222331>.

@article{Blackshaw2010,
abstract = { Whether the size of an animal population is environmentally limited or regulated by density dependent negative feedback mechanisms is of ecological interest. Proponents of limitation theory have issued a set of specific challenges which are addressed in this paper using field data for the insect Tipula paludosa. This species is known to be subject to population crashes caused by adverse environmental conditions and assumed to be limited. We re-examine published data in support of this hypothesis and show that there is also evidence of negative feedback between generations. Meta-analyses of annual count data from individual fields, and regional surveys provide further evidence of negative feedback and it is concluded that population regulation occurs at both local and regional scales. Evidence from other studies is used to propose that cannibalism is the causative mechanism. Since similar negative feedback responses were apparent under both normal and environmentally limiting conditions when populations crash, a single population model that could simulate the differing regional dynamics observed from the annual surveys was produced. We conclude that the range of annual fluctuations observed in T. paludosa populations is the outcome of both limiting and regulating processes, confirming from field observations that these are not exclusive mechanisms.},
author = {Blackshaw, R. P., Petrovskii, S. V.},
journal = {Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena},
keywords = {Tipula paludosa; population limitation; population regulation; population crash; cannibalism; time-discrete model},
language = {eng},
month = {3},
number = {4},
pages = {46-62},
publisher = {EDP Sciences},
title = {Limitation and Regulation of Ecological Populations: a Meta-analysis of Tipula paludosa Field Data},
url = {http://eudml.org/doc/222331},
volume = {2},
year = {2010},
}

TY - JOUR
AU - Blackshaw, R. P.
AU - Petrovskii, S. V.
TI - Limitation and Regulation of Ecological Populations: a Meta-analysis of Tipula paludosa Field Data
JO - Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena
DA - 2010/3//
PB - EDP Sciences
VL - 2
IS - 4
SP - 46
EP - 62
AB - Whether the size of an animal population is environmentally limited or regulated by density dependent negative feedback mechanisms is of ecological interest. Proponents of limitation theory have issued a set of specific challenges which are addressed in this paper using field data for the insect Tipula paludosa. This species is known to be subject to population crashes caused by adverse environmental conditions and assumed to be limited. We re-examine published data in support of this hypothesis and show that there is also evidence of negative feedback between generations. Meta-analyses of annual count data from individual fields, and regional surveys provide further evidence of negative feedback and it is concluded that population regulation occurs at both local and regional scales. Evidence from other studies is used to propose that cannibalism is the causative mechanism. Since similar negative feedback responses were apparent under both normal and environmentally limiting conditions when populations crash, a single population model that could simulate the differing regional dynamics observed from the annual surveys was produced. We conclude that the range of annual fluctuations observed in T. paludosa populations is the outcome of both limiting and regulating processes, confirming from field observations that these are not exclusive mechanisms.
LA - eng
KW - Tipula paludosa; population limitation; population regulation; population crash; cannibalism; time-discrete model
UR - http://eudml.org/doc/222331
ER -

NotesEmbed ?

top

You must be logged in to post comments.

To embed these notes on your page include the following JavaScript code on your page where you want the notes to appear.

Only the controls for the widget will be shown in your chosen language. Notes will be shown in their authored language.

Tells the widget how many notes to show per page. You can cycle through additional notes using the next and previous controls.

    
                

Note: Best practice suggests putting the JavaScript code just before the closing </body> tag.