Lower Bounds for Las Vegas Automata by Information Theory

Mika Hirvensalo; Sebastian Seibert

RAIRO - Theoretical Informatics and Applications (2010)

  • Volume: 37, Issue: 1, page 39-49
  • ISSN: 0988-3754

Abstract

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We show that the size of a Las Vegas automaton and the size of a complete, minimal deterministic automaton accepting a regular language are polynomially related. More precisely, we show that if a regular language L is accepted by a Las Vegas automaton having r states such that the probability for a definite answer to occur is at least p, then r ≥ np, where n is the number of the states of the minimal deterministic automaton accepting L. Earlier this result has been obtained in [2] by using a reduction to one-way Las Vegas communication protocols, but here we give a direct proof based on information theory.

How to cite

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Hirvensalo, Mika, and Seibert, Sebastian. "Lower Bounds for Las Vegas Automata by Information Theory." RAIRO - Theoretical Informatics and Applications 37.1 (2010): 39-49. <http://eudml.org/doc/92712>.

@article{Hirvensalo2010,
abstract = { We show that the size of a Las Vegas automaton and the size of a complete, minimal deterministic automaton accepting a regular language are polynomially related. More precisely, we show that if a regular language L is accepted by a Las Vegas automaton having r states such that the probability for a definite answer to occur is at least p, then r ≥ np, where n is the number of the states of the minimal deterministic automaton accepting L. Earlier this result has been obtained in [2] by using a reduction to one-way Las Vegas communication protocols, but here we give a direct proof based on information theory. },
author = {Hirvensalo, Mika, Seibert, Sebastian},
journal = {RAIRO - Theoretical Informatics and Applications},
keywords = {Las Vegas automata; information theory},
language = {eng},
month = {3},
number = {1},
pages = {39-49},
publisher = {EDP Sciences},
title = {Lower Bounds for Las Vegas Automata by Information Theory},
url = {http://eudml.org/doc/92712},
volume = {37},
year = {2010},
}

TY - JOUR
AU - Hirvensalo, Mika
AU - Seibert, Sebastian
TI - Lower Bounds for Las Vegas Automata by Information Theory
JO - RAIRO - Theoretical Informatics and Applications
DA - 2010/3//
PB - EDP Sciences
VL - 37
IS - 1
SP - 39
EP - 49
AB - We show that the size of a Las Vegas automaton and the size of a complete, minimal deterministic automaton accepting a regular language are polynomially related. More precisely, we show that if a regular language L is accepted by a Las Vegas automaton having r states such that the probability for a definite answer to occur is at least p, then r ≥ np, where n is the number of the states of the minimal deterministic automaton accepting L. Earlier this result has been obtained in [2] by using a reduction to one-way Las Vegas communication protocols, but here we give a direct proof based on information theory.
LA - eng
KW - Las Vegas automata; information theory
UR - http://eudml.org/doc/92712
ER -

References

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  1. T.M. Cover and J.A. Thomas, Elements of Information Theory. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (1991).  Zbl0762.94001
  2. P. Duris, J. Hromkovic, J.D.P. Rolim and G. Schnitger, Las Vegas Versus Determinism for One-way Communication Complexity, Finite Automata, and Polynomial-time Computations. Springer, Lecture Notes in Comput. Sci. 1200 (1997) 117-128.  
  3. J. Hromkovic, personal communication.  
  4. H. Klauck, On quantum and probabilistic communication: Las Vegas and one-way protocols, in Proc. of the ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing (2000) 644-651.  Zbl1296.68058
  5. C.H. Papadimitriou, Computational Complexity. Addison-Wesley (1994).  
  6. S. Yu, Regular Languages, edited by G. Rozenberg and A. Salomaa. Springer, Handb. Formal Languages I (1997).  

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